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COUNTRIES, CULTURES, HISTORY / Israel, Holy Land, Palestina / Christians / The Via Dolorosa, The Way of Sorrow


Legend has it that almost immediately after the crucifixion of Jesus, his followers began to retrace his steps to Calvary. The term –Via Dolorosa- The Way of Sorrow was popularized in the 16th century and its fourteen stations were standardized by the Franciscans during the 19th century. The Way of the Cross, Via Dolorosa or Via Crucis designates a stretch of road between the Antonia fortress and Golgotha, along which Jesus Christ walked bowed under the weight of the Cross. The name dates from the sixteenth century, although the custom of retracing Jesus' steps to Golgotha began in the early centuries of Christianity.


 

Galleries in this topic

The Way of Sorrow- First Station
the Chapel of the Flagellation where tradition holds that Jesus was interrogated by Pilate. The Franciscans and Pilgrim's begin their weekly procession through the Stations of the Cross here, on Friday afternoons. This modest chapel was built on the site of a Crusader oratory. Inside are glass panel representing the scourging of Jesus (center), Pilate cleansing his hands of the blood of the innocent (left), and the liberation of Barabas (right).
The Way of Sorrow-Third Station
The Way of Sorrow, Third Station – A small chapel built by Polish Catholic cavalrymen marks the spot where Jesus fell for the first time. The chapel belongs to the Armenian Catholic Patriarchate.
The Way of Sorrow- Eight Station
The Way of Sorrow- Eight Station. A small plaque with a cross on the wall marks the place where Jesus met his pious women of Jerusalem and told them, “Don’t weep for me, daughters of Jerusalem, but yourselves and your children.” st. Luke
The Way of Sorrow- Second station
The Way of Sorrow, Second station_Second Station- the Chapel of the Flagellation where tradition holds that Jesus was interrogated by Pilate. The Franciscans begin their weekly procession through the Stations of the Cross here, on Friday afternoons. This modest chapel was built on the site of a Crusader oratory. Inside are glass panel representing the scourging of Jesus (center), Pilate cleansing his hands of the blood of the innocent (left), and the liberation of Barabas (right). Ecce Homo Arch – this is the second station along the Via Dolorosa. In the 16th century, pilgrims began to refer to the arch as Ecce Homo Arch, referring to Pilate’s declaration as he presented Jesus to the crowd of spectators –Behold the man!-.In reality it is part of a triumphal arch built by Hadrian in 135 A.D. to commemorate his conquest of Jerusalem. The original arch had three parts> the largest, central arch which spans the Via Dolorosa, the left arch which is no longer in existence, and the right arc that can still be seen today inside the Church of the Sisters of Zion.
The Way of Sorrow-Seventh Station
The Way of Sorrow-Seventh Station. Here the Via Dolorosa intersects the noisy bazaar, and a column marked with the Roman numerals VII indicates where Jesus fell for the second time.

Related topics

The Way of Sorrow- First Station
The Way of Sorrow- Second station
The Way of Sorrow-Third Station
The Way of Sorrow- Fourth Station
The Way of Sorrow- Fifth Station
The Way of Sorrow- Sixth Station
The Way of Sorrow-Seventh Station
The Way of Sorrow- Eight Station
The Way of Sorrow- Ninth Station